OBM Integrative and Complementary Medicine is an international peer-reviewed Open Access journal published quarterly online by LIDSEN Publishing Inc. It covers all evidence-based scientific studies on integrative, alternative and complementary approaches to improving health and wellness.

Topics contain but are not limited to:

  • Acupuncture
  • Acupressure
  • Acupotomy
  • Bioelectromagnetics applications
  • Pharmacological and biological treatments including their efficacy and safety
  • Diet, nutrition and lifestyle changes
  • Herbal medicine
  • Homeopathy
  • Manual healing methods (e.g., massage, physical therapy)
  • Kinesiology
  • Mind/body interventions
  • Preventive medicine
  • Research in integrative medicine
  • Education in integrative medicine
  • Related policies

It publishes a variety of article types: original research, review, communication, opinion, case report, study protocol, comment, conference report, technical note, book review, etc.

There is no restriction on paper length, provided that the text is concise and comprehensive. Authors should present their results in as much detail as possible, as reviewers are encouraged to emphasize scientific rigor and reproducibility. 

Indexing: DOAJ-Directory of Open Access Journals.

Archiving: full-text archived in CLOCKSS.

Rapid publication: manuscripts are undertaken in 6.1 days from acceptance to publication (median values for papers published in this journal in the first half of 2020, 1-2 days of FREE language polishing time is also included in this period). A first decision provided to authors of manuscripts submitted to this journal are approximately 3.5 weeks (median values) after submission.

Current Issue: 2021  Archive: 2020 2019 2018 2017 2016
Open Access Correction

Correction: Armstrong C. Unity, Continuity, Structure, and Function. The Ongoing Search for a Deeper Understanding of the Many Roles Attributed to Fascia in the Living Human Body - An Osteopathic Perspective. OBM Integrative and Complementary Medicine 2021; 6: 16

Colin Armstrong *

Osteopathic Centre, 1732 Voie Aurelienne, 13450 Grans, France

* Correspondence: Colin Armstrong

Academic Editor: Nancy Nies Byl

Special Issue: The Importance of the Fascia for Manual Osteopathic Medicine

Received: October 14, 2021 | Accepted: October 14, 2021 | Published: October 15, 2021

OBM Integrative and Complementary Medicine 2021, Volume 6, Issue 4, doi:10.21926/obm.icm.2104035

Recommended citation: Armstrong C. Correction: Armstrong C. Unity, Continuity, Structure, and Function. The Ongoing Search for a Deeper Understanding of the Many Roles Attributed to Fascia in the Living Human Body - An Osteopathic Perspective. OBM Integrative and Complementary Medicine 2021; 6: 16. OBM Integrative and Complementary Medicine 2021;6(4):3; doi:10.21926/obm.icm.2104035.

The Original Article was published on 31 August 2021.

© 2021 by the authors. This is an open access article distributed under the conditions of the Creative Commons by Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium or format, provided the original work is correctly cited.

The authors wish to make the following correction to the paper [1]. Replace:

It has been suggested that the dissection of cadavers encourages “dissective thinking” [29]. There is a significant difference between the dissected, disassembled “anatomical” body as presented in anatomy textbooks, and a living, functioning organism. However, extensive knowledge of both is necessary. The creation of planes and flat surfaces by the dissector’s scalpel is not an entirely accurate representation of the three-dimensional spatial organization of living matter inside a living organism, especially in terms of micro-anatomy. Sheets of fascia can be created using a scalpel during dissection to represent separate “layers” like the pages of a book. However, endoscopic exploration reveals that they do not appear to be arranged like this inside the living body but rather form an integral part of a three-dimensional, fluid-filled, fibrillar matrix [7].

3. Conclusions

It is becoming increasingly apparent that the living body functions as an integrated unit, with fascia as the unifying element. The fascial system extends into every part of the body as a multidirectional web of fibers in which everything is at once connected and separated, enabling the various systems of the body to work together as a coherent, interdependent structural and functional entity. The conventional understanding of the human body as an assemblage of separate, distinct anatomical structures is being challenged by modern research that is providing a growing body of evidence of more porous and less permeable systems that extend across tissue and organ boundaries.

with:

It has been suggested that the dissection of cadavers encourages “dissective thinking” [30]. There is a significant difference between the dissected, disassembled “anatomical” body as presented in anatomy textbooks, and a living, functioning organism. However, extensive knowledge of both is necessary. The creation of planes and flat surfaces by the dissector’s scalpel is not an entirely accurate representation of the three-dimensional spatial organization of living matter inside a living organism, especially in terms of micro-anatomy. Sheets of fascia can be created using a scalpel during dissection to represent separate “layers” like the pages of a book. However, endoscopic exploration reveals that they do not appear to be arranged like this inside the living body but rather form an integral part of a three-dimensional, fluid-filled, fibrillar matrix [7].

3. Conclusions

It is becoming increasingly apparent that the living body functions as an integrated unit, with fascia as the unifying element. The fascial system extends into every part of the body as a multidirectional web of fibers in which everything is at once connected and separated, enabling the various systems of the body to work together as a coherent, interdependent structural and functional entity. The conventional understanding of the human body as an assemblage of separate, distinct anatomical structures is being challenged by modern research that is providing a growing body of evidence of systems that extend across tissue and organ boundaries that are proving to be more porous and less impermeable than once thought.

This change has no material impact on the discussion and conclusions of the paper, but rectifies an editorial error that was not noticed during the proof reading of the paper. The author would like to apologize for any convenience caused to the readers by these changes.

Competing Interests

The authors has declared that no competing interests exist.

References

  1. Armstrong C. Unity, continuity, structure, and function. The ongoing search for a deeper understanding of the many roles attributed to fascia in the living human body - an osteopathic perspective. OBM Integr Complement Med. 2020; 5: 19. doi:10.21926/obm.icm.2103026. [CrossRef]
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