OBM Neurobiology is an international peer-reviewed Open Access journal published quarterly online by LIDSEN Publishing Inc. By design, the scope of OBM Neurobiology is broad, so as to reflect the multidisciplinary nature of the field of Neurobiology that interfaces biology with the fundamental and clinical neurosciences. As such, OBM Neurobiology embraces rigorous multidisciplinary investigations into the form and function of neurons and glia that make up the nervous system, either individually or in ensemble, in health or disease. OBM Neurobiology welcomes original contributions that employ a combination of molecular, cellular, systems and behavioral approaches to report novel neuroanatomical, neuropharmacological, neurophysiological and neurobehavioral findings related to the following aspects of the nervous system: Signal Transduction and Neurotransmission; Neural Circuits and Systems Neurobiology; Nervous System Development and Aging; Neurobiology of Nervous System Diseases (e.g., Developmental Brain Disorders; Neurodegenerative Disorders).

OBM Neurobiology publishes research articles, technical reports and invited topical reviews. Although the OBM Neurobiology Editorial Board encourages authors to be succinct, there is no restriction on the length of the papers. Authors should present their results in as much detail as possible, as reviewers are encouraged to emphasize scientific rigor and reproducibility.

Archiving: full-text archived in CLOCKSS.

Rapid publication: manuscripts are undertaken in 11.8 days from acceptance to publication (median values for papers published in this journal in the second half of 2021, 1-2 days of FREE language polishing time is also included in this period).

Current Issue: 2022  Archive: 2021 2020 2019 2018 2017

Special Issue

How COVID-19 Changed Individual and Social Life: Psychological and Mental illness Studies on the Pandemic Outcomes

Submission Deadline: March 31, 2023 (Open) Submit Now

Guest Editors

Ines Testoni, Professor

Department of Philosophy, Sociology, Education and Applied Psychology (FISPPA), University of Padova, 35131 Padua, Italy.

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Research interests: death and dying, palliative psychology, grief and mourning, end-of-life

Adriano Zamperini, Professsor

Department of Philosophy, Sociology, Education and Applied Psychology (FISPPA), University of Padova, 35131 Padua, Italy

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Research interests: environmental changes and health; social violence; ethics and psychology.

Dr. Lorenza Palazzo

Department of Philosophy, Sociology, Pedagogy and Applied Psychology (FISPPA), University of Padova, 35131, Padova, Italy

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Research interests: ALS palliative care; Ambiguous loss; Gestalt therapy

About This Topic

COVID-19 has caused a global crisis with multifaceted dimensions and has had a significant impact on the world’s societies, transforming what was initially assumed as a public health crisis into a new psychosocial architecture where some novel and ancients difficulties emerge or became more severe. The pandemic has profoundly altered many aspects of how societies function, with important effects. The disruption to normal life, the introduction of social distancing measures, the limitation of in-person interaction have severely distressed individuals and communities, hampering social relationships for a long time. Indeed, the pandemic has created moments of extraordinary threat, involving citizens, families, states and civil society to face terror through a predominant language that have focused on mainstream epidemiological and economic responses, certainly important but insufficient to manage the global human crisis.
In this scenario the psychological perspective permits to think of how to alleviate the short- and long-term consequences of the pandemic on individuals and societies. In the psycho-social area, they are to underline for importance the emergence of social inequalities, the transformation of politics of information and media communication, the reconfiguration of human relationships, differentiation between human groups (i.e. the vaccinated/unvaccinated; the infected and those testing negative). Furthermore, it must be considered that fragile people are being disproportionately affected and distressed by COVID-19. The different impacts of COVID-19 resulting from poverty and marginalization reflect historic inequalities and differential risks that should be psychosocially managed and resolved. Furthermore, COVID-19 may open the way to an intensification of authoritarian-populist perspectives, aimed at reinforcing discriminatory social relationships, overcoming this situation represents a true challenge for all psychology scientists, in relation to the possibilities of realizing analysis of current social changes which might also lead to the development of new theories and methodologies. Indeed, this call is aimed at imaging how social and psychological sciences may transform this liminal moment in a movement towards a more equal, inclusive and collectivist political approach, where rethinking of psychosocial functions, civil society organizations, and inclusiveness.

Possible Topics:

We invite manuscripts from all psychological disciplines on the topic of the COVID-19 pandemic and associated psychological aspects which may include negative as well as positive perspectives. Both original papers as well as systematic reviews and meta-analyses are welcome in this special issue. The topics covered may include (but are not limited to):

  • How the pandemic crisis influences on the ideas about the interdependence between psychological wellbeing and social relationships;
  • The social context of contagion;
  • The spread of new behaviours, and changing nature of social contacts and mobility
  • Individual and social factors that explain the different distress responses to the pandemic;
  • The consequences of the COVID-19 crisis to individual, family and community relationships;
  • Fear of death and COVID-19 distress (fear of vaccine, fear of infection, dear of contact …) and attitude/behavior changes;
  • Traumatic loss and grief and their individual, family, community effects;
  • Development of measures to assess COVID-related psychological issues;
  • Interdisciplinary methodological approaches that assess or describe COVID-19 related psychological experiences and mental health;
  • Potential psychological or mental health impacts of people caused by COVID-19 infection (e.g., stigma, isolation, depression, etc.);
  • Needs defined in different contexts requiring the recalibration of psychological and social support;
  • Changes in the psychological model of intervention, therapy and support;
  • The pandemic, social inequalities (conditions of marginalized and vulnerable people);
  • Social inequalities problematic conditions during the pandemic crisis, with particular attention to women, fragile people and groups considered disposable, for their marginalization;
  • The psychosocial factors implied in health crisis that hamper the respect of human rights;
  • The pandemic social information and its psychological effects;
  • Literary and artistic representations of the pandemic and their psychological effects;
  • The COVID-19 pandemic in the context of past pandemics;
  • The COVID-19 pandemic, biopolitics reflection and perception of limitations of freedom;
  • The social crisis and the psychological perception of the role of science and technology;
  • The ethics of care-giving, ethics dilemmas and psychological distress;
  • Community and relational space change and their psychological effects;
  • Psychological effects of temporal/spatial dynamics and structural changes;
  • Psychological factors of the fragmentation of the public space.
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